/ / / 12 Useful Ways to Say No in German That Aren’t Nein

12 Useful Ways to Say No in German That Aren’t Nein

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You may already know the meaning of nein – or the classic way to say no in German. While knowing this one word is a useful way to answer many questions, it won’t be enough to communicate everything you want to say.

What if you want to decline something politely? Or if you want to be very firm with someone? Depending on the situation, you’ll want to express yourself differently.

We’ll go over every type of no situation you might encounter, including the standard German no, polite ways to say no, saying no when you are hesitant, and saying no emphatically. We’ll also break down the sometimes confusing concept of doch.

Read next: Negation in German – Difference Between Nein, Nicht and Kein

No in German at a Glance

German

English

Nein

No

Ne

No

No

Nein danke

No thank you

Leider

Unfortunately no

Jein

Yes/No

Ich glaube nicht

I don't think so

Gar nicht

Not at all

Überhaupt nicht

Not at all

Absolut nicht

Absolutely not

Auf gar keinen Fall

Under no circumstances

Simple No in German

no in german girl hand

If you want to simply say no you have different options, from the classic “nein” to the more informal “ne” or “nö”.

Nein

Nein ” is the most commonly used word to say “no” in German. It can initiate a negative sentence (which we’ll discuss later), but also stand on its own or answer a simple yes or no question. 

German

English

Anja

Johann

Hast du Hunger?

Nein

Anja

Johann

Are you hungry?

No

Ne

Ne ” is used in the North of Germany and among a younger demographic in Germany. It’s a rather informal way of saying “no” in German.

German

English

Anja



Johann

Hast du deine Hausaufgaben schon gemacht?

Ne, noch nicht.

Anja



Johann

Have you done your homework already?


No, not yet.

” is the most informal way of saying “no” in German. It is most commonly used among young German speakers and is a carefree way of saying “no”.

German

English

Anja


Johann

Weisst du wo meine Schuhe sind?

Nö, das weiss ich nicht.

Anja


Johann

Do you know where my shoes are at?

No, I don’t know.

Read next: 105 Basic German Words – Best Vocab List for Beginners

Using No in a Negative Sentence

As we briefly alluded to in the section about nein, a negative sentence in German contains somewhat of a double negation. While you initiate your sentence with “nein”, the complete negation happens when you add “nicht” (for verbs) and “kein” (for objects). Check out the following examples. 

Using Nicht

  1. Nein, ich möchte keinen Kaffee.
  2. Nein, wir haben kein Auto.
  3. Nein, sie essen keine Schokolade.
  1. No, I don’t want any coffee.
  2. No, we don’t have a car. 
  3. No, they don’t eat any chocolate.

Using Kein

  1. Nein, sie fährt nicht nach Frankreich.
  2. Nein, ihr könnt nicht kommen.
  1. No, she doesn’t drive to France.
  2. No, you can’t come.

Do you see the difference? When you negate an object you use “kein” and when you negate a verb or an action you add “nicht”. 

No to Decline Something Politely

If you are looking for ways to kindly decline something or want to express your regret about something, there are two main ways to go about saying this.

Nein danke

You might have guessed it on your own – “ nein danke ” means “no thank you” in German. It is most often used to decline something that was offered to you.

German

English

Anja


Johann

Möchten Sie einen Kaffee?

Nein danke.

Anja


Johann

Would you like a coffee?

No, thank you.

Leider

Leider ” can be translated to “unfortunately” and you can also use it to politely decline plans and offers or to express your regret over something.

German

English

Anja



Johann

Möchtest du am Dienstag mit mir ins Kino?

Leider kann ich am Dienstag nicht.

Anja



Johann

Do you want to go to the movies with me on Tuesday?

Unfortunately, I can’t on Tuesday.

Read next: Leider Geil (Unfortunately Awesome) — Lyrics and Translation

Hesitant No in German

Sometimes you can’t really answer a question with a simple “yes” or “no”. Sometimes it’s something in the middle and other times you’re just not sure. If you are looking for ways to express your more ambivalent feelings try the alternatives below. 

Jein

Can you guess what “ jein ” means? It’s a funny combination of “ja” and “nein” and means “yes” and “no” at the same time. It is often used as a little joke and an explanation usually follows. Check out the following examples and discover more:

German

English

Anja


Johann

Gehst du nach Spanien?

Jein. Ich gehe nicht nach Spanien, ich fliege.

Anja


Johann

Will you go to Spain?


I won’t go to Spain, I’ll fly there.

Ich glaube nicht

If you are unsure you can also use “ ich glaube nicht ” to say “I don’t think so” and express your uncertainty. 

German

English

Anja

Johann

Wird es regnen?

Nein, ich glaube nicht.

Anja

Johann

Will it rain?

No, I don’t think so.

Emphatic No in German

Do you feel strongly about something and want to convey that feeling? Try adding a quantifying adverb such as gar, überhaupt oder absolut in front of your “nicht”.

Gar nicht

Gar nicht ” means “not at all” and quantifies how much you don’t want to do something or don’t like something. “Gar” can also go with “kein”.

German

English

Anja


Johann

Gehst du gerne zur Schule?

Nein, gar nicht.

Anja


Johann

Do you like going to school?

No, not at all.

Überhaupt nicht

Überhaupt nicht ” is another fun way of saying “not at all”. Just like “gar kein” you can also “überhaupt” together with kein. 

German

English

Ex 1


Ex 2

Sie kocht überhaupt nicht.

Ich habe überhaupt keine Lust.

Ex 1


Ex 2

She doesn’t cook at all.

I’m really not up to it at all.

Absolut nicht

You guessed it – “ absolut nicht ” means “absolutely not”. You can also use it in the context of objects and turn it into “absolut kein”. 

Auf gar keinen Fall

Auf gar keinen Fall ” is a frequently used expression that translates to “under no circumstances”.

German

Auf gar keinen Fall stehe ich um 5 Uhr morgens auf.

English

Under no circumstances will I get up at 5am.

Using Doch to Say No in German

Doch ” is a commonly used word in German but it is often misunderstood by German learners because there is no direct translation for “doch” in English. You use it when you counter a negative statement and it is used similarly to the words “actually” or “after all” in English. Check out the examples below to learn “doch” in context. 

German

English

Anja

Johann

Es regnet nicht.

Doch es regnet, guck mal aus dem Fenster!

Anja

Johann

It’s not raining.

It actually is raining, look out the window!

We actually wrote a whole post on how to use doch if you want to learn more.

Conclusion

Whether it’s an unsure “jein” or a firmly convinced “auf gar keinen Fall” – your new vocabulary will surely bring some variety into your language skills. Listen closely to how German speakers use these new expressions in context and don’t be afraid to make a mistake every now and then. 

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